Body Stress In the Lower Torso

The lower back can be considered as the foundation of the spine. Just the acts of lying down, sitting or standing can put pressure on the lower back, as both the deep muscles and the superficial muscles tighten to support our skeletons.
Any overload of physical, emotional , or even chemical stresses can cause these muscles to tighten in a defensive mode. Just think of what we put our bodies through on a daily basis, never mind the falls and accidents that we have all experienced at some stage or another of our lives.
The defensive tightening of muscles is a necessary response to the stress overload, but it should be temporary, and not become a chronic ‘splinting’ of the spine.
The aim of Body Stress Release is to stimulate those protective layers of muscles to relax back to their normal tone and function. At this point communication is restored and the brain recognises the site of irritation, thus facilitating our miraculous in-built abilities to self-heal.
Unfortunately, due to the busy pace of modern life, as well as our inability to recognise when our bodies are signalling that we are in these stress overload situations, the muscles do not relax and it becomes a chronic holding pattern of deep muscle tension. Each day we add to this tension by overloading our bodies at work, home and at leisure.

The lower back has many important nerves that innervate the lower back itself, as well as the nerves that travel into the hips, buttocks and legs. There are also connections to the abdominal organs via the autonomic nervous system. Irritation due to pressure on these nerves can cause the organs to be either overactive or underactive.

If the sensory nerves are placed under pressure due to either intense or long term deep muscle contraction, then they can be stimulated to cause abnormal sensation ranging from pain to pins and needles or numbness. If the motor nerves are irritated by pressure, then the muscle groups that they innervate may become either over active causing spasms or cramps. The opposite of this would be muscles that are flaccid or do not have their normal function or strength.

The most common effect of body stress (locked in muscle tension) in the lower back region would be effects like lower back pain, digestive problems, constipation, diarrhoea, flatulence, stomach aches or stomach cramps, groin pain, menstrual pain, bladder infections and bloating.

Lower back pain

Everyone suffers from lower back pain at some point of their lives. If the body has not been able to deal with the original site of irritation, then this lower back pain is likely to be constant or recur at regular intervals. It is stated that more work days are lost due to lower back pain than any other reason. As the lower back muscles tighten over time, lower back pain may not be the only effect. Frequently the nerves that exit the lower back could get irritated, contributing to effects like sciatica and groin pain. The lower back pain is unlikely to settle until the origin of the problem is addressed, and this involves the easing of the protective muscle action around the lumbar spine with the help of a Body Stress Release practitioner.

Groin Pain

Groin pain can be debilitating and it can cause such discomfort that walking can be difficult. The cause of groin pain could be referred from the lower back as this is where the nerves that supply the groin region originate. As the body responds to an overload of either physical or mechanical stress in the lower back, or mental or emotional stress, or even chemical stress, the muscles around the spine tighten in a protective manner. This can then irritate the nerves due to pressure and cause the nerve to be stimulated. This can cause local pain or a referred pain, depending on where the irritated nerves travel to. Often this will result in groin pain or sciatica type effects. The groin pain is unlikely to settle until the origin of the problem has been addressed, and the protective muscles in the lower back are stimulated to let go of their protective state, thus taking the pressure off the nerves.

Digestive problems

The digestive system is innervated by the Autonomic nervous system. Body stress (stored muscle tension) in the lower back can irritate these nerves as the muscles tighten in response to a stress overload. Digestive problems can arise as the irritated nerves can either cause the digestive tract to be under or over active. If the irritated nerve supply effect causes underactivity, then the digestive problems could manifest as constipation. If the irritated nerve supply effect causes overactivity, then the digestive problems could manifest as diarrhoea.

The digestive problems could potentially continue indefinitely until the origin of the problem is addressed, which is often the lower back.
Additionally, the digestive problems may arise as a result of exposure to chemical stresses. These are substances which we either eat, drink, inhale or absorb due to contact with our skin. Examples of these may be gluten or lactose intolerances. If a person who has an intolerance consumes these, it may lead to digestive problems as well as lower back pain due to bloating of the digestive tract. It is important to be aware of the negative effects the stress overloads can have on our bodies. Along with this, a balanced, healthy diet is a good way to avoid digestive problems.

Flatulence

The digestive system is innervated by the autonomic nervous system. As the muscles alongside the spine tighten in response to a stress overload, the connections to the digestive system may be affected. Flatulence can arise as the irritated nerves can cause the digestive tract to be either over or under active, and digestion may not occur at the desired rate, causing a build-up of gas.

Additionally, the flatulence may arise as a result of exposure to chemical stresses. These are substances which we either eat, drink, inhale or absorb due to contact with our skin. Examples of these may be gluten or lactose intolerances. If a person who has an intolerance consumes these, it may lead to flatulence as well as lower back pain due to bloating of the digestive tract. It is important to be aware of the negative effects the stress overloads can have on our bodies. Along with this, a balanced, healthy diet is a good way to avoid flatulence.

Menstrual pain

It is quite common to experience menstrual pain as well as lower back pain during menstruation. There is a direct link between the uterus and the lower back via the utero sacral ligaments which explains why it is not unusual to experience menstrual pain or lower back pain during menstruation. As the uterus swells during the menstrual cycle, pressure is exerted on the lower back via the utero sacral ligaments and this can cause lower back pain. Lower back tension could also place pressure on the uterus, causing menstrual pain.

Bladder infection

Bladder infection could occur when body stress (stored muscle tension) in the lower back disrupts the nerve supply to the bladder and thus normal functioning can be compromised. Additionally, the bladder infection is liker to recur if nerve communication is not restored as the immune system is not able to function optimally. Often the symptoms of bladder infection will be accompanied by lower back stiffness. It is advisable to be checked for body stress at the very first signs of bladder infection, as the worst can often be avoided.

Constipation

Body stress (stored muscle tension) in the lower back can irritate the nerve supply to the digestive tract. If the nerves are under stimulated it could result in constipation as the colon would not be functioning optimally. If the constipation does not seem to have a medical cause or if it does not improve with medication, then it may well improve as the muscle tension eases with Body Stress Release. Constipation may also be the result of a poor diet or chemical stresses which the person is ingesting and their system is unable to effectively digest these foods.

Stomach aches

The digestive system is innervated by the Autonomic nervous system. These nerves can be affected by pressure in the lower back as the muscles tighten in response to a stress overload. Stomach aches can arise as the irritated nerves can either cause the digestive tract to be under or over active or it can disrupt the communication from the nerves resulting in sub optimal functioning. If the irritated nerve supply effect causes underactivity, then the stomach pain could manifest as constipation. If the irritated nerve supply effect causes overactivity, then stomach pain could manifest as diarrhoea. The stomach pain could potentially continue indefinitely until the origin of the problem is addressed, which is often pressure in the lower back due to body stress (stored muscle tension).

Additionally, the stomach aches may arise as a result of exposure to chemical stresses. These are substances which we either eat, drink, inhale or absorb due to contact with our skin. Examples of these may be gluten or lactose intolerances. If a person who has an intolerance consumes these, it may lead to stomach pain as well as lower back pain
due to bloating of the digestive tract. It is important to be aware of the negative effects the stress overloads can have on our bodies. Along with this, a balanced, healthy diet is a good way to avoid stomach pain.

Bloating

The digestive system is innervated by the autonomic nervous system. As the muscles alongside the spine tighten in response to a stress overload, the connections to the digestive system may be affected. Bloating can arise as the irritated nerves can cause the digestive tract to be over or under active, and digestion may not occur at the desired rate, causing a build-up of gas.

Additionally, the bloating may arise as a result of exposure to chemical stresses. These are substances which we either eat, drink, inhale or absorb due to contact with our skin. Examples of these may be gluten or lactose intolerances. If a person who has an intolerance consumes these, it may lead to bloating as well as lower back pain due to pressure on the lower back. It is important to be aware of the negative effects the stress overloads can have on our bodies. Along with this, a balanced, healthy diet is a good way to avoid bloating.

Note:
**Information presented here is not qualified medical advice, as BSR is a non-medical and non-therapeutic technique. Nothing expressed herein creates a BSR Practitioner-Client relationship.

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